112.0   Fuel hazard classes

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Overview  

The technical safety characteristics of a fuel determine the safety measures required for the safe storage, distribution and use of fuels as specified by the respective authorities. In the Federal Republic of Germany, the "Occupational Safety Ordinance" and the "Ordinance on Hazardous Substances" are applicable.

Directive 1999/45/EC (Article 4) refers to hazardous preparations; the classifications and designations that apply to fuels and their flammability are listed below. These are intended to point out the hazards associated with these substances to people handling them. The specified standardized designations (R-records) must be observed.

Highly flammable

Substances and preparations are categorized as highly flammable and marked with the danger symbol "F+" and the danger designation "highly flammable" if the test results (flash point, initial boiling point) have been determined in accordance with the relevant standard and have the following values:

R12 Highly flammable
  • liquid substances and preparations that have a flash point that is below 0 °C and a boiling point (or initial boiling point in case of a boiling range) of no more than 35 °C;
  • gaseous substances and preparations that are flammable when they come into contact with air at a normal temperature and pressure.
Examples: petrol and various paints

Easily flammable

Substances and preparations are categorized as easily flammable and marked with the danger symbol "F" and the danger designation "easily flammable" if the test results (flash point, initial boiling point) have been determined in accordance with the relevant standard and have the following values:

R11 Easily flammable
  • Solids and preparations that are easily ignited by brief exposure to an ignition source and can continue to burn or smolder after the source has been removed;
  • Liquid substances and preparations that have a flash point of less than 21 °C, but are not highly flammable.

Flammable

Substances and preparations are categorized as flammable if the test results (flash point, initial boiling point) have been determined in accordance with the relevant standard and have the following values:

R10 Flammable
  • liquid substances and preparations that have a flash point of at least 21 °C and not greater than 55 °C.
Examples: kerosene, wax preservative

However, experience has shown that a preparation with a flash point of at least 21 °C and not greater than 55 °C must not be categorized as flammable provided it does not continue to burn on its own and handling the preparation does not represent any danger for anyone.